PILATES STYLE SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2016
Welcome to the Pilates Style Newsletter

Six times a year, we bring you Pilates-related news, original feature articles, bonus material from the current issue of Pilates Style magazine and more.
 
We want to hear from you! If you know of a Pilates event, or have news to share with your community, email us at editor@pilatesstyle.com.
 
In this issue
 

Music to Your Ears

You already know that certain songs can make you smile. As it turns out, a well-timed tune can do a whole lot more: Science shows that it can help you exercise better, sleep more soundly and even shed a few pounds. Add the following melodies to your playlist—and get ready to push play on some impressive benefits.

Benefit: Exercise harder
Power play: Research published in the Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research showed that athletes who listened to fast or slow motivational songs ran faster than those who tuned into calm music or nothing at all.
Download these: “Firework” by Katy Perry; “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” by Marvin Gaye; “We Are the Champions” by Queen

Benefit: Recover faster
Power play: After a tough workout, cue up a mellow playlist. Relaxing tunes can help your heart rate and blood pressure return to baseline faster, and improve your recovery time, according to a study from India’s Narayana Medical College.
Download these: “Strawberry Swing” by Coldplay; “By Your Side” by Sade; “Cherry Blossom Girl” by Air

Benefit: Eat less
Power play: Save that Beyoncé track for later: Fast-paced tunes encourage you to eat faster, which can translate to bigger servings. In a study from Cornell University, people who listened to soft jazz during a meal consumed 175 fewer calories than those who didn’t.
Download these: “Kind of Blue” by Miles Davis; “To Another Place,” by Ronda

Benefit: Sleep soundly
Power play: Playing classical music for 45 minutes before bedtime can help you nod off faster and sleep more soundly, according to Hungarian researchers.
Download these: “Rhapsody on a Theme of Pagini” by Rachmaninoff; “Claire de Lune” by Debussy; “Moonlight Sonata” by Beethoven

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Your Back-to-Reality Sanity Guide

During the summertime, the living’s easy. But when the weather cools and fall rolls around, it can get busy. School starts up, clients return from vacation, and most people kick into a higher gear. How can you keep up? Time-management expert Kathryn McKinnon, founder of McKinnon & Company and a Harvard Business School executive coach, shares practical tips to help you maximize every minute.

Prep the night before. Skip the morning scramble by starting a step ahead. Along with setting out your clothes and packing lunches, spend some time planning out the day ahead. Jot down everything that you want to accomplish, and number them in order of priority. Try to tackle the most important things in the morning, when you’re at your freshest.

Block out some uninterrupted time. When things get hectic, you may feel pulled in multiple directions. Try to carve out a chunk of time to focus on your project of the day; research shows that it takes 25 minutes to return to the task at hand after an interruption. Need to tackle invoices or work on a project? Declare your office a no-entry zone.

Break things up into manageable chunks. Trying to tackle a big project all at once is overwhelming. In fact, people usually can only focus for 20 minutes at a time. A smarter approach: Divvy things up into multiple goals. For example, if you’re trying to organize your entire office, start with your files one day and then tackle your inbox the next.

Rely on your calendar. Whether it’s a coffee with a friend or that Pilates session with your instructor, schedule everything in 15-minute increments. This attention to detail will prevent you from double-booking yourself or spending too much time on one task. At the end of each week, review your calendar to see how you’re spending your time and what you streamline or delegate.

Give yourself some wiggle room. When you’re mapping out your schedule, add in blocks for the unexpected, whether that’s a work emergency or family obligation. That way, a sudden event won’t throw off your entire day. Most of the time, nothing will pop up—and you can use that much-needed free time for yourself (read: Pilates!).

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Expert Q & A with Rael Isacowitz

Q: I’m thinking about becoming a Pilates instructor. Do you have any advice on how I can determine if it would be a good fit for me?

A. Congratulations for asking this question. It’s one that I wish more people would ask themselves. Often, people decide to become Pilates instructors without giving it adequate thought and consideration. Teaching is a very challenging profession. Having taught dance, yoga, swimming and gymnastics, and lectured in exercise sciences, I can say that Pilates is one of the most demanding disciplines to teach. There are so many facets, and you will need to adapt to a myriad of different situations.

First and foremost, you need to believe in and be committed to Pilates—not only as a form of exercise, but also as a way of life with far-reaching implications. As such, you’ll need to practice consistently, and integrate Pilates into your life and your lifestyle. (I realize that this may not be everyone’s point of view, but it’s my firm and ardent belief.) You should also want to impact lives and society as a whole for the better, and believe in your heart of hearts that Pilates is an excellent vehicle to do so.

Besides knowing the Pilates repertoire extremely well and being a proficient mover, you need to be well versed in exercise sciences, and understand human movement from a practical and academic viewpoint. Also necessary is a thirst for learning. You should never stop wanting to grow as a Pilates practitioner and as a human being; this will directly impact your teaching.

Having people skills is also important. If given the choice between a Pilates teacher whose strength is either being an excellent mover with great academic qualifications or one who relates to people and communicates well, I’d choose the latter every day of the week (and weekends). Knowledge can be acquired through study, and movement skills can be improved through practice, but knowing how to cue well and communicate with clear intent is a skill learned over a lifetime. Some people seem to have an innate, visceral feel for it. It’s the most fundamental part of being a teacher, yet the one part that can’t be taught. I also believe that it demands an abundance of patience and compassion. Being able to have a positive effect on people is a gift.

The more soul searching you can do now, the better it will be in the long run. You may decide after reading this answer that Pilates is not for you—it’s not for everyone. If this is your decision, I commend you for being honest with yourself and wish you the very best. However, you may be even more excited about embarking on this challenging but greatly rewarding journey. In this case, I welcome you with open arms to a profession that has brought me a lifetime of satisfaction, joy and more blessings than I could ever count.

Rael Isacowitz, MA, has been practicing Pilates for more than 35 years, and is the founder and director of BASI Pilates, a comprehensive Pilates education organization spanning the globe established in 1989. Rael designed the concepts for BASI Systems equipment and was a driving force in founding the company. He also created Pilates Interactive, the one-of-a-kind e-learning software, and has authored two best-selling books, Pilates and Pilates Anatomy (Human Kinetics), the latter co-authored with Karen Clippinger.


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Close-Up: Hundred with a Twist

by Maria Leone

Pilates instructor and teacher trainer Maria Leone works with some of the world’s top Olympic and pro athletes. What do they, including snowboarder Louie Vito and surfer Maya Gabeira, have in common? Their emphasis is on keeping up their conditioning while rehabbing from and preventing injury. In the September/October issue of Pilates Style, Leone crafted a Reformer workout featuring moves that can also be adapted to the mat. The following bonus exercise adds a twist to the traditional Hundred for an extra challenge.

Purpose: strengthens the abdominals, back, hip flexors and shoulder girdle stabilizers; increases trunk stability and lower-back mobility

Setup: Lie on your back in the Hundred position, with your legs long and low, feet in Pilates stance (heels together, toes apart) and arms by your sides. Lift your head, neck and the tips of your shoulder blades.

1. Exhale, pulling both knees together toward one shoulder, curling your pelvis off the mat.

2. Inhale, returning to the Hundred position and pause.

3. Exhale, pulling both knees toward your opposite shoulder, curling your pelvis off the mat. Do 6–10 reps.

Tip: To help keep your head and shoulders lifted, reach vigorously with both arms.

Modifications: Keep your legs lifted higher in the Hundred position.

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One-and-Done Dinners

What’s for supper? We’ve got you covered: These three dishes from Camilla Saulsbury’s 200 Best Sheet Pan Recipes (Robert Rose, 2016) are destined to become your new standbys. Not only are they delicious and nutritious, but they only use one sheet pan to cook, so cleanup is a breeze.

Roast Chicken Quarters with Lemon-Dill Spring Vegetables
This roast chicken dinner is elegant enough for a dinner party, but quick and easy enough for a weeknight.
(Serves 4)

4 chicken leg quarters (about 3 pounds), patted dry
3 tablespoons olive oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 (12-ounce) package frozen pearl onions, thawed
1 (1-pound) package peeled baby carrots
1 pound yellow-fleshed fingerling or baby potatoes, halved lengthwise
2 cups trimmed radishes, halved lengthwise
¼ cup chopped fresh dill
1 tablespoon finely grated lemon zest
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

1. Preheat the oven to 500°F. Line a 18-x-13-inch rimmed sheet pan with foil.
2. Place the chicken, skin side up, on the prepared pan, spacing it out evenly. Brush with 1 tablespoon oil and season generously with salt and pepper. Roast in the oven for 10 minutes.
3. Meanwhile, in a large bowl, gently toss together the onions, carrots, potatoes, radishes, the remaining oil, ¾ teaspoon salt and ½ teaspoon pepper.
4. Remove the pan from oven and nestle the vegetables around the chicken pieces. Roast for 20–25 minutes, or until the vegetables are tender, the chicken skin is crispy and an instant-read thermometer inserted in the thickest part of a chicken thigh registers 165°F.
5. Transfer the chicken to a serving platter or individual plates. Sprinkle the vegetables with dill, lemon zest and lemon juice; toss to coat. Serve with the chicken.

Persian Rice–Stuffed Butternut Squash
Full of autumnal flavors like dried cherries and pistachios, this stuffed butternut squash makes for a hearty vegetarian meal.
(Serves 4)

2 butternut squash, halved lengthwise
4 tablespoons olive oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 red bell pepper, chopped
1 (12-ounce) package frozen brown rice, thawed
¾ cup roasted pistachios or almonds, coarsely chopped
½ cup finely chopped green onions
⅓ cup chopped dried cherries
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
¾ teaspoon ground cumin

1. Preheat the oven to 400°F. Line a 18-x-13-inch rimmed sheet pan with foil or parchment paper.
2. Using a metal spoon, scrape out the seeds and membranes from the squash halves. Score the flesh with a sharp knife. Place the squash, cut side up, on the prepared pan. Brush the cut sides with 2 tablespoons of the oil and season with salt and pepper. Roast for 35 minutes.
3. Remove the pan from oven and place the red pepper alongside the squash. Drizzle pepper with 1 tablespoon oil. Roast for 10 minutes.
4. Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, combine the rice, pistachios, green onions, cherries, cinnamon, cumin and the remaining oil. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
5. Remove the pan from the oven and spoon the rice mixture into the squash cavities. Roast for 15–18 minutes, or until the squash is fork-tender and the stuffing is warmed through.

California Fish Tacos with Cucumber and Pineapple
You’d never guess that these tasty tacos are a cinch to prepare. You can use any mild, lean white fish, such as snapper or tilapia, in place of cod.
(Serves 4)

4 skinless cod fillets (about 6 ounces each)
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 teaspoon chipotle powder
¼ teaspoon salt
1 cup diced fresh pineapple
8 (6-inch) corn tortillas
1 cup diced cucumber
Fresh cilantro leaves (optional)
Lime wedges (optional)
Guacamole (optional)

1. Preheat the broiler, with the rack set 4–6 inches from the heat source. Line an 18-x-13-inch rimmed sheet pan with foil or parchment paper; spray with nonstick cooking spray.
2. Place the fish on the prepared pan. Lightly brush both sides of the fish with oil. Sprinkle with the chile powder and salt. Broil for 3 minutes.
3. Open the oven door and scatter the pineapple around the fish. Close the door and broil for 1–3 minutes, or until the fish is opaque and flakes easily. Flake the fish into small pieces.
4. Fill the tortillas with the fish, broiled pineapple and cucumber. Serve with cilantro, lime wedges and guacamole, if desired.

Courtesy of 200 Best Sheet Pan Recipes by Camilla Saulsbury © 2016 (www.robertrose.ca). Reprinted with publisher permission. Available where books are sold.

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Calendar of Events

September 8–10
What: Pilates Through Pregnancy
Where: Body Mechanix, Johannesburg, South Africa
BASI Pilates

September 9–December 18
What: Comprehensive Teacher Training Program
Where: BASI Pilates Studio, Costa Mesa, CA
BASI Pilates

September 9–February 26
What: Comprehensive Teacher Training Program
Where: Coastal Core Fit, Virginia Beach, VA
BASI Pilates

September 9–December 4
What: Comprehensive Teacher Training Program
Where: Physio Logic Pilates & Movement, Brooklyn, NY
BASI Pilates

September 9–11
What: 303 Chair and Barrel Teacher Training
Where: Corpus Christi, TX
Pilates Instructor Academy

September 10–13
What: Pilates for Dancers
Where: Pilates House, Munich, Germany
BASI Pilates

September 10–December 11
What: Comprehensive Teacher Training Program
Where: The Cypress Center, Pacific Palisades, CA
BASI Pilates

September 10–11
What: 302 Cadillac/Trapeze Table Teacher Training
Where: St. Louis, MO
Pilates Instructor Academy

September 15–18
What: Mat Teacher Training Program
Where: Macadamia Pilates Studio, Nelspruit, South Africa
BASI Pilates

September 16–17
What: Classical Pilates Symposium With The U.S.P.A.
Where: Orlando, FL
US Pilates Association

September 16–17
What: Basic Pilates Seminar at Clasique Acupuncture & Pilates Studio
Where: Asheville, NC
Pilates-Gratz

September 16–18
What: Lori Coleman-Brown in Lake St. Louis MO PYC Workshops 2016
Where: St. Louis, MI
Pilates-Gratz

September 16–18
What: 101 Fundamental and Beginning Mat Teacher Training
Where: Tom’s River, NJ
Pilates Instructor Academy

September 16–December 11
What: Comprehensive Teacher Training Program
Where: Body in Motion, Aptos, CA
BASI Pilates

September 16–Febuary 19
What: Comprehensive Teacher Training Program
Where: Studio Rituel, Paris, France
BASI Pilates

September 16–December 11
What: Comprehensive Teacher Training Program
Where: Tsawwassen Wellness Centre, Tsawwassen, Canada
BASI Pilates

September 16–December 11
What: Comprehensive Teacher Training Program
Where: LiveBy Pilates, Ottawa, Canada
BASI Pilates

September 16–October 16
What: Comprehensive Teacher Training Program
Where: White Mountain Pilates, Mt. Shasta, CA
BASI Pilates

September 17
What: The Form and Function (F2) System
Where: BASI Pilates Studio, Costa Mesa, CA
BASI Pilates

September 17–18
What: 102 Intermediate and Advanced Mat Teacher Training
Where: St. Louis, MO
Pilates Instructor Academy

September 21–24
What: Lolita’s Legacy Teacher Training Program
Where: Fribourg, Switzerland
Lolita Pilates

September 22–29
What: 303 Chair and Barrel Teacher Training
Where: Ft. Collins, CO
Pilates Instructor Academy

September 22–January 15
What: Comprehensive Teacher Training Program
Where: The Pilates Clinic, Wimbledon, London, United Kingdom
BASI Pilates

September 22–December 25
What: Comprehensive Teacher Training Program
Where: Bodynetworx Studio, Istanbul, Turkey
Body Networx

September 23–24
What: Nancy Hurd Workshop
Where: Palm Beach Gardens, FL
Lolita Pilates

September 23–March 12
What: Comprehensive Teacher Training Program
Where: Bildungswerk of the Landessportbund Hesser, Frankfurt, Germany
BASI Pilates

September 23–February 12
What: Comprehensive Teacher Training Program
Where: Iron Butterfly Pilates, Charlotte, NC
BASI Pilates

September 23–February 12
What: Comprehensive Teacher Training Program
Where: Core - A Movement Studio, Cincinnati, OH
BASI Pilates

September 23–December 11
What: Comprehensive Teacher Training Program
Where: A Body in Balance Pilates, Las Vegas, NV
BASI Pilates

September 23–February 19
What: Comprehensive Teacher Training Program
Where: The Movement Practice, Amsterdam, Netherlands
BASI Pilates

September 23–March 19
What: Comprehensive Teacher Training Program
Where: Pilates Antonio Leon, Santiago De Compostela, Spain
Darte Pilates

September 23–26
What: 101 Fundamental and Beginning Mat Teacher Training
Where: Overland Park, KS
Pilates Instructor Academy

September 23–26
What: 101 Fundamental and Beginning Mat Teacher Training
Where: Norfolk, VA
Pilates Instructor Academy

September 23–25
What: 101 Fundamental and Beginning Mat Teacher Training
Where: Ft. Collins, CO
Pilates Instructor Academy

September 24–25
What: 303 Chair and Barrel Teacher Training
Where: St. Louis, MO
Pilates Instructor Academy

September 26–28
What: Pilates for Injuries and Pathologies
Where: Bali Innovations in Pilates Studio, Ubud, Bali, Indonesia
BASI Pilates

September 29–30
What: Innovations in Pilates
Where: Bali Innovations in Pilates Studio, Ubud, Bali, Indonesia
BASI Pilates

September 29–October 2
What: Lolita’s Legacy Teacher Training Program
Where: Spokane, WA
Precision Pilates of Spokane

September 30–February 12
What: Comprehensive Teacher Training Program
Where: inBalance, San Antonio, TX
BASI Pilates

September 30–October 1
What: 102 Intermediate and Advanced Mat Teacher Training
Where: Overland Park, KS
Pilates Instructor Academy

October 1
What: Pilates for the Mature Client
Where: Healthy Changes Pilates, Reading, MA
BASI Pilates

October 1–2
What: BoneSmart: Pilates for Osteoporosis
Where: BASI Pilates Studio, Costa Mesa, CA
BASI Pilates

October 1–January 15
What: Mat Teacher Training Program
Where: Studio 76, Abano Terme, Italy
BASI Pilates

October 2
What: The Art of Cueing
Where: Healthy Changes Pilates, Reading, MA
BASI Pilates

October 6–9
What: Lolita’s Legacy Teacher Training Program
Where: Perth, Scotland
Balansi Pilates

October 6–9
What: Lolita’s Legacy Teacher Training Program
Where: Kiev, Ukraine
Fitness 4 You

October 7
What: Comprehensive Teacher Training Program
Where: Studio Blue, Portland, OR
BASI Pilates

October 7–9
What: 102 Intermediate and Advanced Mat Teacher Training
Where: Ft. Collins, CO
Pilates Instructor Academy

October 8–9
What: 102 Intermediate and Advanced Mat Teacher Training
Where: Norfolk, VA
Pilates Instructor Academy

October 8–9
What: 102 Intermediate and Advanced Mat Teacher Training
Where: Tom’s River, NJ
Pilates Instructor Academy

October 13–16
What: Mat Teacher Training Program
Where: Tash B Pilates, Ballito, South Africa
BASI Pilates

October 13–17
What: Pilates Master Mentor Program
Where: Palm Beach Gardens, FL
Lolita Pilates

October 13–January 22
What: Comprehensive Teacher Training Program
Where: Pilates y Movimiento, Providencia, Santiago, Chile
BASI Pilates

October 14–16
What: Pilates Through Pregnancy
Where: Pilates in Tuscany, Prato, Florence, Italy
BASI Pilates

October 15–16
What: Buff Bones® Instructor Training
Where: Millburn, NJ
Buff Bones

October 15–16
What: 102 Intermediate and Advanced Mat Teacher Training
Where: St. Louis, MO
Pilates Instructor Academy

October 17–November 16
What: Buff Bones® Instructor Training online course
Where: Online
Buff Bones

October 20–January 22
What: Comprehensive Teacher Training Program
Where: Pilates in Tuscany, Prato, Florence, Italy
BASI Pilates

October 20–23
What: Mat Teacher Training Program
Where: Edb Pilates, Cape Town, South Africa
BASI Pilates

October 21–22
What: BASI Fit Mat Course
Where: Kore Studios, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
BASI Fit

October 21–January 21
What: Mat Teacher Training Program
Where: Pilates by Janessa, Stockholm, Sweden
BASI Pilates

October 21–22
What: 301 Reformer Teacher Training
Pilates Instructor Academy

October 22–23
What: Innovations in Pilates
Where: Beach Pilates, Toronto, Canada
BASI Pilates

October 22–January 28
What: Comprehensive Teacher Training Program
Where: Pilates Bodies in Motion, University Place, WA
BASI Pilates

October 28–May 21
What: Comprehensive Teacher Training Program
Where: Healthy Changes Pilates, Reading, MA
BASI Pilates

October 28–30
What: Pilates Anatomy
Where: LiveBy Pilates, Ottawa, Canada
BASI Pilates

October 28–December 11
What: Comprehensive Teacher Training Program
Where: AASFP, Hong Kong, China
AASFP

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In this issue
Music to Your Ears
Your Back-to-Reality Sanity Guide
Expert Q & A with Rael Isacowitz
Close-Up: Hundred with a Twist
One-and-Done Dinners
Calendar of Events
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