Book Smart

Two new books on various aspects of the method will enhance your teaching and your practice.

Studio Shape Up, The Keys to Transforming Your Fitness Studio Into a Thriving Business
by Chelsea Streifeneder (2019, Morgan James Publishing)

THE AUTHOR: Streifeneder is the owner of Body Be Well studios in Red Hook and Catskill, NY.

THE ELEVATOR PITCH: She delivers practical and outside-the-box suggestions about how to grow your business for any current or aspiring studio owner, focusing on getting clients through the door and creating experiences that will bring them back. A handy Start-Up Checklist guides Pilates professionals (or yoga, barre, etc., teachers) through the realities of establishing your own business. Developing client loyalty is key, and Streifeneder shares Six Rules for profitable memberships and packages.

BONUS: Other experienced teachers also share their insights about owning their studios and community building. For example, Carrie Pages of Carrie Pages Pilates in Willington, NC hosted a movie night featuring a Joseph Pilates film to share the historical relevance of Pilates. A chapter devoted to “Making Retail Work” addresses how branded clothes and unique items can boost your bottom line.


Analyzing Scoliosis, The Pilates Instructor’s Guide to Scoliosis
by Erin Myers (2019, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform)

THE AUTHOR: Myers, a Balanced Body-trained teacher, is the owner of Spiral Spine Pilates in Nashville, TN, and a leading expert in healing scoliosis via Pilates.

THE ELEVATOR PITCH: This is an indispensable guide for instructors seeking to increase their knowledge in working with scoliotic clients. She gives readers a powerful set of tools, as opposed to more conventional approaches, which rely on memorizing a rigid set of exercises. The first part of the book provides a deep dive into understanding what scoliosis is and how it presents in a client’s body; Part II teaches you how to analyze the scoliotic body; and the final section shares Myers’ tried and true movement concepts, exercises
and various muscle tests that help untwist the scoliotic spine.

BONUS: Myers sheds light on the emotional issues her young and mature scoli clients often experience, including body dysmorphia and emotional shame. She offers helpful tips for dealing with them, such as letting young clients come up with creative names for their scoli exercises and making new homework cards for them. —Tess Ghilaga


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